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Scarborough-Rouge Park

Ward 25

James Weir Farmhouse
1021 Tapscott Road
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. This farmhouse was built 1861 from stones gathered from the surrounding fields. It is named after James Weir (1814-1897), who came to Scarborough from Scotland in 1833. Weir was a Loyalist who assisted in the dispersion of the rebels under William Lyon Mackenzie in 1837 during the Upper Canada Rebellion, which was an insurrection against the British-led government of Upper Canada. James Weir Farmhouse was restored in 1975 and used as a home for night caretakers at a nearby factory for Titan Wheels. When esteemed Canadian actor Jim Carrey was in his teens, he and his family worked custodial jobs for Titan Wheels and this was their home.

Ted Hamer Art Box
Tapscott Road and Finch Avenue East
This Ted Hamer Art Box piece references the saying “If you love something, set it free; if it comes back, it’s yours” by depicting a girl releasing a bird, that symbolizes love.

Evond Blake Mural
Located on railway underpass along Finch Avenue East, south of the intersection with Morningside Avenue
This mural, “Interoh Gale”, combines to mean “a gateway to a sustainable future by using renewable resources, such as wind.” The artwork illustrates the complex balance of preserving green space while continuing to develop industry and expand urban growth by painting elements of nature and symbols of renewable energy sources amongst a futuristic looking, abstract backdrop.

Brad McMillan Mural
Located on railway underpass along Morningside Avenue, west of the intersection with Old Finch Avenue
This mural celebrates the local community and its diversity through images of iconic local landmarks, such as a large bear, to symbolize the importance of the Toronto Zoo and active people to recognize the area’s growing skateboard and cycling culture.

Joyce Trimmer Park
8450 Sheppard Avenue East
This park is named after Joyce Trimmer, Canadian politician and the first woman to be elected Mayor of Scarborough (before Scarborough was amalgamated into the City of Toronto in 1998). Trimmer was a strong advocate for the preservation of greenspace within Scarborough throughout her time in public life, and this park is a fitting tribute to her legacy. The space features a multipurpose sports field, a basketball court, a gazebo, a splash pad and a children’s playground.

Toronto Zoo
2000 Meadowvale Road
The Toronto Zoo is a popular destination for families and tourists. It is the largest zoo in Canada and has over 5,800 animals. In 1966, the Metropolitan Toronto Zoological Society was formed with the objective of developing a new zoo for Toronto, replacing the antiquated Riverdale Zoo. It was built on 287-hectares of land owned by the Metropolitan Toronto & Region Conservation Authority and is owned and operated by the City of Toronto.

Rouge River Conservation Centre
1749 Meadowvale Road
The Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, run by the Rouge Valley Foundation, is dedicated to protecting and restoring the natural heritage of the Rouge Valley, which is the largest urban park in North America stretching from Toronto into Markham and Whitchurch-Stouffville. The Foundation operates environmental restoration projects and research, as well as running educational programming and interpretive walks. The Conservation Centre is housed in a restored historic home that was built in 1893 and owned by the Pearse family, who operated a sawmill on the Rouge River.

Rouge National Urban Park
1749 Meadowvale Road
The largest urban park in North America, Rouge National Urban Park offers excellent biodiversity, some of the few remaining working farms in the city, Carolinian ecosystems, Toronto’s only campground, one of the region’s largest marshes, a beach at Lake Ontario, outstanding hiking trails, and over 10,000 years of human history, including some of the oldest known Indigenous sites in the country.

Ganatsekwyagon
1749 Meadowvale Road
*Note: Ganatsekwyagon (also known as Bead Hill Historic Site) is not accessible to the public. Please acknowledge this important piece of Indigenous history as you walk through the public trails of Rouge National Urban Park. Rouge National Urban Park includes some of the oldest discovered Indigenous sites in Canada, with human presence dating back to more than 10,000 years ago. Near the mouth of Rouge River, the only known remaining and intact 17th-century Seneca site in Canada was discovered. It consists of a burial area, a tree covered midden on the hillside and a campsite that dates back to approximately 3000 BCE. The true location of Ganatsekwyagon is unknown. It has been suggested that this in part due to mistakes made by early cartographers, but it was also common practice for Iroquois peoples to move their villages every 10-20 years. Ganatsekwyagon covered, roughly, 10 acres of land and was home to between 500 and 800 people during its peak.

Port Union Waterfront Park
175 Chesterton Shores
Located at the eastern edge of the city between the mouth of Highland Creek and the Rouge River, this waterfront park provides 13.5 hectares of green space and connects the Port Union community to Lake Ontario. It features 3.8 kilometers of continuous waterfront trail, great views of Lake Ontario and its shoreline, a new pedestrian bridge over Highland Creek and trail connections north into the Highland Creek watershed. At the city’s edge, the existing bridge over the Rouge River connects the park to the City of Pickering.

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Explore Scarborough-Rouge Park

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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DON’T MISS
BigArtTO
September 30 – October 3
8pm – 11pm
Malvern Community Centre

Neighbourhood Stroll: Rouge

This stroll features plenty of spectacular greenspace, like Rouge National Urban Park and Port Union Waterfront Park, historic sites such as James Weir House and the Rouge River Conservation Centre. You’ll also find public art, and one of the city’s most popular attractions, the Toronto Zoo. Explore the many local businesses dotted along Sheppard Avenue East, Morningside Avenue and Port Union Road.

Main Streets: Sheppard Avenue East, Morningside Avenue., Port Union Road

Note: Some neighbourhood strolls may cross over into more than one ward.

  1. James Weir Farmhouse
    1021 Tapscott Road
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. This farmhouse was built 1861 from stones gathered from the surrounding fields. It is named after James Weir (1814-1897), who came to Scarborough from Scotland in 1833. Weir was a Loyalist who assisted in the dispersion of the rebels under William Lyon Mackenzie in 1837 during the Upper Canada Rebellion, which was an insurrection against the British-led government of Upper Canada. James Weir Farmhouse was restored in 1975 and used as a home for night caretakers at a nearby factory for Titan Wheels. When esteemed Canadian actor Jim Carrey was in his teens, he and his family worked custodial jobs for Titan Wheels and this was their home.

  2. Ted Hamer Art Box
    Tapscott Road and Finch Avenue East
    This Ted Hamer Art Box piece references the saying “If you love something, set it free; if it comes back, it’s yours” by depicting a girl releasing a bird, that symbolizes love.

  3. Evond Blake Mural
    Located on railway underpass along Finch Avenue East, south of the intersection with Morningside Avenue
    This mural, “Interoh Gale”, combines to mean “a gateway to a sustainable future by using renewable resources, such as wind.” The artwork illustrates the complex balance of preserving green space while continuing to develop industry and expand urban growth by painting elements of nature and symbols of renewable energy sources amongst a futuristic looking, abstract backdrop.

  4. Brad McMillan Mural
    Located on railway underpass along Morningside Avenue, west of the intersection with Old Finch Avenue
    This mural celebrates the local community and its diversity through images of iconic local landmarks, such as a large bear, to symbolize the importance of the Toronto Zoo and active people to recognize the area’s growing skateboard and cycling culture.

  5. Joyce Trimmer Park
    8450 Sheppard Avenue East
    This park is named after Joyce Trimmer, Canadian politician and the first woman to be elected Mayor of Scarborough (before Scarborough was amalgamated into the City of Toronto in 1998). Trimmer was a strong advocate for the preservation of greenspace within Scarborough throughout her time in public life, and this park is a fitting tribute to her legacy. The space features a multipurpose sports field, a basketball court, a gazebo, a splash pad and a children’s playground.

  6. Toronto Zoo
    2000 Meadowvale Road
    The Toronto Zoo is a popular destination for families and tourists. It is the largest zoo in Canada and has over 5,800 animals. In 1966, the Metropolitan Toronto Zoological Society was formed with the objective of developing a new zoo for Toronto, replacing the antiquated Riverdale Zoo. It was built on 287-hectares of land owned by the Metropolitan Toronto & Region Conservation Authority and is owned and operated by the City of Toronto.

  7. Rouge River Conservation Centre
    1749 Meadowvale Road
    The Rouge Valley Conservation Centre, run by the Rouge Valley Foundation, is dedicated to protecting and restoring the natural heritage of the Rouge Valley, which is the largest urban park in North America stretching from Toronto into Markham and Whitchurch-Stouffville. The Foundation operates environmental restoration projects and research, as well as running educational programming and interpretive walks. The Conservation Centre is housed in a restored historic home that was built in 1893 and owned by the Pearse family, who operated a sawmill on the Rouge River.

  8. Rouge National Urban Park
    1749 Meadowvale Road
    The largest urban park in North America, Rouge National Urban Park offers excellent biodiversity, some of the few remaining working farms in the city, Carolinian ecosystems, Toronto’s only campground, one of the region’s largest marshes, a beach at Lake Ontario, outstanding hiking trails, and over 10,000 years of human history, including some of the oldest known Indigenous sites in the country.

  9. Ganatsekwyagon
    1749 Meadowvale Road
    *Note: Ganatsekwyagon (also known as Bead Hill Historic Site) is not accessible to the public. Please acknowledge this important piece of Indigenous history as you walk through the public trails of Rouge National Urban Park. Rouge National Urban Park includes some of the oldest discovered Indigenous sites in Canada, with human presence dating back to more than 10,000 years ago. Near the mouth of Rouge River, the only known remaining and intact 17th-century Seneca site in Canada was discovered. It consists of a burial area, a tree covered midden on the hillside and a campsite that dates back to approximately 3000 BCE. The true location of Ganatsekwyagon is unknown. It has been suggested that this in part due to mistakes made by early cartographers, but it was also common practice for Iroquois peoples to move their villages every 10-20 years. Ganatsekwyagon covered, roughly, 10 acres of land and was home to between 500 and 800 people during its peak.

  10. Port Union Waterfront Park
    175 Chesterton Shores
    Located at the eastern edge of the city between the mouth of Highland Creek and the Rouge River, this waterfront park provides 13.5 hectares of green space and connects the Port Union community to Lake Ontario. It features 3.8 kilometers of continuous waterfront trail, great views of Lake Ontario and its shoreline, a new pedestrian bridge over Highland Creek and trail connections north into the Highland Creek watershed. At the city’s edge, the existing bridge over the Rouge River connects the park to the City of Pickering.

Accessibility information: The James Weir House, Ted Hamer Art Box, Evond Blake Mural, and Brad MacMillan mural are all viewable from the street. The paths in Joyce Trimmer Park are fully paved throughout. Please note that the remaining points of interest in this stroll may include steep hills, stairs, and unpaved areas. This includes the Toronto Zoo, Rouge National Urban Park, and Port Union Waterfront Park. Please also keep in mind that this is one of the city’s largest neighbourhoods. This stroll spans over 20 kilometres and is easier when broken into smaller parts.

Soundtracks of the City

From global superstars to local favourites and ones to watch, the Soundtracks of the City playlists all feature artists who have called Toronto home. Whether it’s a lyric about the neighborhood, an artist representing a cultural community, or a tie-in to the StrollTO itinerary itself, all the music reflects connections to an individual ward or the City as a whole.

Music was chosen based on an artist’s Spotify presence and each song’s broad appeal, as well as its associations with the cultures, languages and ethnicities that reflect Toronto’s neighborhoods and diverse music scene. Soundtracks of the City combines 425 songs that feature more than 500 different local artists or acts, showcasing songs in 23 different languages.