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Parkdale High Park

Ward 4

Runnymede Collegiate
569 Jane Street
An historic school that first opened in 1927 with many noteworthy alumni such as Corporal Frederick George Topham, a Victoria Cross recipient from his service in World War II, who is honoured with a plaque out front of the building.

Teiaiagon
The land within this neighbourhood is situated in what was once part of Teiaiagon (meaning “crosses the stream”), a 17th-century village built by the Five Nations Haudenosaunee. The village was placed here in order to control hunting territories and trade routes throughout the region. Reports from early European settlers indicate the village had about 5000 inhabitants and many agricultural fields where crops like corn, beans, pumpkins, and tobacco were harvested. An undisturbed burial plot of a Teiaiagon resident (likely dated back to the 1680s) was found in the early 2000s and was reburied in another location after consultation with the Six Nations community.

Boating Regatta on the Humber Mural
724 Annette Street
Commissioned by the Baby Point Village BIA and painted in 2011 by local artist Walter Ruston, this mural highlights the importance of the Humber River in the history of the neighbourhood.

Albanian Muslim Society of Toronto
564 Annette Street
This is the current home of one of the oldest Muslim congregations in Toronto, originally primarily founded for the Albanian Muslim community in the Junction area in the early 1960s. The congregation moved to this location in the early 1970s. There is a plaque on the side of the building that honours its founder, Regip Assim.

Fire Station 424
462 Runnymede Road
Originally constructed in the late 1920s, this fire station was threatened with closure in the early 2010s. By this point, the station had become a beloved community landmark, and residents of the neighbourhood – concerned over potentially slower response times for emergencies – lobbied to keep it open. Toronto Fire Services ultimately decided to keep the station as a fire education centre. Local historical societies are still working to get the building listed as a heritage structure.

Beresford Park
400 Beresford Avenue
This park features an off-leash dog area, a children’s playground, and a wading pool.

Great White Oak Tree
37 Weatherell Street
*The tree is located partially on private property. Please observe from the street. This tree located behind 37 Weatherell Street was officially designated a member of the Tuhbenahneequay Ancient Grove that acknowledges trees along the historic Toronto Carrying Place that are over a century old. The name Tuhbenahneequay was chosen as a tribute to the daughet of Wabanosay, Chief of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation at the time of the Toronto Purchase. This particular tree is estimated to be over 300 years old, and is likely among the oldest surviving trees in Toronto.

Bloor and Durie Art Box
Bloor Street West and Durie Street
This artwork has been designed to echo traditional European embroidery patterns, particularly those of Ukrainian origin. Embroidery has a rich cultural history in Ukraine, appearing in folk dress as well as weddings and other celebrations.

Runnymede Theatre
2223 Bloor Street West
Designed in the classical style by architectural firm Chapman and Oxley, the 1,400 seat Runnymede Theatre opened in June 1927. The theatre featured many murals and the ceiling was painted to resemble the sky, with the intention of giving patrons the feeling of sitting outdoors. Initially operating as a venue for vaudeville, the theatre switched to films until it closed in 1972, becoming a bingo hall. It became a movie theatre again between 1980 and 1999, and now serves as a retail space.

Neil McLellan Park & Bloor West Village BIA Plaque
263 Beresford Avenue
A small parkette with a children’s playground. There is also a plaque in the park, which commemorates the founding of the Bloor West Village BIA. In the late 1960s, local merchants along Bloor Street West in this area proposed a new idea for the City of Toronto to collect taxes from businesses within an area to, in turn, fund local streetscape improvements and promote the area. The Bloor West Village Business Improvement Area officially came to be in 1970, the first of its kind anywhere in the world.

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Explore Parkdale High Park

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

DON’T MISS
BigArtTO
November 18 – 21
6pm – 9pm
Parkdale Library

Neighbourhood Stroll: Runnymede-Bloor West Village

This stroll features historic buildings such as Fire Station 424 and the old Runnymede Theatre, one of Toronto’s oldest surviving trees, and an important piece of the Islamic history of Toronto with the Albanian Muslim Society of Toronto. The stroll passes through both the Baby Point Gates BIA (with many local businesses to visit) and the Bloor West Village BIA, which was the first BIA in the world when inaugurated in 1970!

Main Streets: Bloor Street West, Jane Street

Note: Some neighbourhood strolls may cross over into more than one ward.

  1. Runnymede Collegiate
    569 Jane Street
    An historic school that first opened in 1927 with many noteworthy alumni such as Corporal Frederick George Topham, a Victoria Cross recipient from his service in World War II, who is honoured with a plaque out front of the building.

  2. Teiaiagon
    The land within this neighbourhood is situated in what was once part of Teiaiagon (meaning “crosses the stream”), a 17th-century village built by the Five Nations Haudenosaunee. The village was placed here in order to control hunting territories and trade routes throughout the region. Reports from early European settlers indicate the village had about 5000 inhabitants and many agricultural fields where crops like corn, beans, pumpkins, and tobacco were harvested. An undisturbed burial plot of a Teiaiagon resident (likely dated back to the 1680s) was found in the early 2000s and was reburied in another location after consultation with the Six Nations community.

  3. Boating Regatta on the Humber Mural
    724 Annette Street
    Commissioned by the Baby Point Village BIA and painted in 2011 by local artist Walter Ruston, this mural highlights the importance of the Humber River in the history of the neighbourhood.

  4. Albanian Muslim Society of Toronto
    564 Annette Street
    This is the current home of one of the oldest Muslim congregations in Toronto, originally primarily founded for the Albanian Muslim community in the Junction area in the early 1960s. The congregation moved to this location in the early 1970s. There is a plaque on the side of the building that honours its founder, Regip Assim.

  5. Fire Station 424
    462 Runnymede Road
    Originally constructed in the late 1920s, this fire station was threatened with closure in the early 2010s. By this point, the station had become a beloved community landmark, and residents of the neighbourhood – concerned over potentially slower response times for emergencies – lobbied to keep it open. Toronto Fire Services ultimately decided to keep the station as a fire education centre. Local historical societies are still working to get the building listed as a heritage structure.

  6. Beresford Park
    400 Beresford Avenue
    This park features an off-leash dog area, a children’s playground, and a wading pool.

  7. Great White Oak Tree
    37 Weatherell Street
    *The tree is located partially on private property. Please observe from the street. This tree located behind 37 Weatherell Street was officially designated a member of the Tuhbenahneequay Ancient Grove that acknowledges trees along the historic Toronto Carrying Place that are over a century old. The name Tuhbenahneequay was chosen as a tribute to the daughet of Wabanosay, Chief of the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation at the time of the Toronto Purchase. This particular tree is estimated to be over 300 years old, and is likely among the oldest surviving trees in Toronto.

  8. Bloor and Durie Art Box
    Bloor Street West and Durie Street
    This artwork has been designed to echo traditional European embroidery patterns, particularly those of Ukrainian origin. Embroidery has a rich cultural history in Ukraine, appearing in folk dress as well as weddings and other celebrations.

  9. Runnymede Theatre
    2223 Bloor Street West
    Designed in the classical style by architectural firm Chapman and Oxley, the 1,400 seat Runnymede Theatre opened in June 1927. The theatre featured many murals and the ceiling was painted to resemble the sky, with the intention of giving patrons the feeling of sitting outdoors. Initially operating as a venue for vaudeville, the theatre switched to films until it closed in 1972, becoming a bingo hall. It became a movie theatre again between 1980 and 1999, and now serves as a retail space.

  10. Neil McLellan Park & Bloor West Village BIA Plaque
    263 Beresford Avenue
    A small parkette with a children’s playground. There is also a plaque in the park, which commemorates the founding of the Bloor West Village BIA. In the late 1960s, local merchants along Bloor Street West in this area proposed a new idea for the City of Toronto to collect taxes from businesses within an area to, in turn, fund local streetscape improvements and promote the area. The Bloor West Village Business Improvement Area officially came to be in 1970, the first of its kind anywhere in the world.

Accessibility information: This walk is entirely accessible on paved streets and paths, and all points of interest are viewable from street level.