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Don Valley North

Ward 17

The Jack Pine Remembered
15 Barberry Place
This free-standing, double-sided structure by artist Panya Clark Espinal plays with notions of depictions and reproductions of nature. It takes a scene from Tom Thomson’s famous painting The Jack Pine and digitizes and enlarges it to the size of a normal pine tree. The pixelated work is intended as a metaphor for the way pieces of information are made into memories, while the fading and revealing of the image highlights the precariousness of memory as time goes on.

Thomas Clarke House
9 Barberry Place
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. This heritage designated house, dating back to 1855, was built by Thomas Clark, an early European settler of the area who purchased much of the land nearby in the 1840s. Much of the lumber used to construct the house was white pine, which was cut from the property surrounding it. The home is the only structure that remains from the area’s pioneer past.

Across the Great Spans of Time
662 Sheppard Avenue East
A public art piece by Clare Scott-Taggart featuring six bronze stylized seed pods, Across the Great Spans of Time was installed as part of a nearby condo development in 2009. The piece is meant to symbolize the environment, with the pods a symbol of the vast farmlands that once occupied this area. It is also meant to symbolize new beginnings, which in this case is a nod to both the new condo development it was situated on, and also nearby St. Gabriel Church, which owned most of the land and then maintained a small part of it to build a new, environmentally-sustainable church building.

Alice Zhang Art Box
Sheppard Avenue East and Greenbriar Road
The design focuses upon the little things that makes a community a whole.

Paul Hollingsworth Art Box
Sheppard Avenue East and Bessarion Road
Toronto is raccoon city. We live together, we share, we fight and we have a grudging respect of each other. But Toronto’s unofficial symbol is lacking from the body of woodland style art. The box represents the location of one of the artist’s first encounters with Toronto’s secondary population.

Ethennonnhawahstihnen Park
80 McMahon Drive
A new city park now open within Concord Park Place. The park’s name (pronounced Etta-nonna wasti-nuh) means “where they had a good, beautiful life” in Wendat, and is intended to honour the Indigenous heritage who once lived on the site, as well as the important Moatfield Ossuary, which served as a cemetery and was located nearby. The park includes a firepit, a multipurpose field, a playground, a splash pad, and an outdoor rink. The park also contains a spectacular collection of public art pieces by artists such as Michael Belmore, Kimiis, Inc., Demakersvan, An Te Liu, and Ken Lum.

Kid’s Play Mural
Sheppard Avenue East and Leslie Street
This mural is a City of Toronto project managed by Mural Routes. Artist Bill Wrigley drew inspiration for it as he thought about his childhood while driving in traffic. He remembered the freedom and joy he felt leaping, jumping and swinging as a child in the 1960s and wanted this mural to remind other drivers of their childhood.

East Don Parkland
1240 Sheppard Avenue East
The East Don Parkland is part of a long chain of parks following the East Don River. The East Don Trail snakes through these ravines and green spaces providing a beautiful opportunity for hiking and biking. In the fall you can often find salmon swimming upstream to spawn. The Don Valley has undergone extensive conservation efforts over the past few decades to create this beautiful urban green space and will continue to improve in the future.

Newtonbrook Creek Path
55 Forest Grove Drive
A 5.3 kilometer trail that features a river and is good for all skill levels. The trail meanders its way along a heavily forested valley that features black cherry, beech, skeletal beech, and basswood trees.

Bayview Village Park
2945 Bayview Avenue
A 5.2-hectare park on Bayview Avenue north of Sheppard Avenue East that features a ball diamond, three outdoor tennis courts, a splash pad and a children’s playground. Another notable aspect of this park is the air raid siren that remains in the park, which dates back to 1959. Intended to warn against an imminent nuclear attack, it remains an enduring legacy of the Cold War era. The siren is one of only three remaining in Toronto, with the other two being located at Trinity Bellwoods Park and Harbourfront Centre.

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Explore Don Valley North

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

DON’T MISS
BigArtTO
September 16 – 19
8pm – 11pm
Odeyto Indigenous Centre

Neighbourhood Stroll: Bayview Village

This stroll features plenty of fantastic greenspace with the East Don Parklands and Newtonbrook Creek Trail, some fantastic public art such as The Jack Pine Remembered and new installations in Ethennonnhawahstihnen Park, and touches on the heritage of the area with the Thomas Clark House. The stroll passes nearby Sheppard Avenue East and Finch Avenue East, both of which have an eclectic collection of great local businesses.

Main Streets: Sheppard Avenue East and Finch Avenue East

Note: Some neighbourhood strolls may cross over into more than one ward.

  1. The Jack Pine Remembered
    15 Barberry Place
    This free-standing, double-sided structure by artist Panya Clark Espinal plays with notions of depictions and reproductions of nature. It takes a scene from Tom Thomson’s famous painting The Jack Pine and digitizes and enlarges it to the size of a normal pine tree. The pixelated work is intended as a metaphor for the way pieces of information are made into memories, while the fading and revealing of the image highlights the precariousness of memory as time goes on.

  2. Thomas Clarke House
    9 Barberry Place
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. This heritage designated house, dating back to 1855, was built by Thomas Clark, an early European settler of the area who purchased much of the land nearby in the 1840s. Much of the lumber used to construct the house was white pine, which was cut from the property surrounding it. The home is the only structure that remains from the area’s pioneer past.

  3. Across the Great Spans of Time
    662 Sheppard Avenue East
    A public art piece by Clare Scott-Taggart featuring six bronze stylized seed pods, Across the Great Spans of Time was installed as part of a nearby condo development in 2009. The piece is meant to symbolize the environment, with the pods a symbol of the vast farmlands that once occupied this area. It is also meant to symbolize new beginnings, which in this case is a nod to both the new condo development it was situated on, and also nearby St. Gabriel Church, which owned most of the land and then maintained a small part of it to build a new, environmentally-sustainable church building.

  4. Alice Zhang Art Box
    Sheppard Avenue East and Greenbriar Road
    The design focuses upon the little things that makes a community a whole.

  5. Paul Hollingsworth Art Box
    Sheppard Avenue East and Bessarion Road
    Toronto is raccoon city. We live together, we share, we fight and we have a grudging respect of each other. But Toronto’s unofficial symbol is lacking from the body of woodland style art. The box represents the location of one of the artist’s first encounters with Toronto’s secondary population.

  6. Ethennonnhawahstihnen Park
    80 McMahon Drive
    A new city park now open within Concord Park Place. The park’s name (pronounced Etta-nonna wasti-nuh) means “where they had a good, beautiful life” in Wendat, and is intended to honour the Indigenous heritage who once lived on the site, as well as the important Moatfield Ossuary, which served as a cemetery and was located nearby. The park includes a firepit, a multipurpose field, a playground, a splash pad, and an outdoor rink. The park also contains a spectacular collection of public art pieces by artists such as Michael Belmore, Kimiis, Inc., Demakersvan, An Te Liu, and Ken Lum.

  7. Kid’s Play Mural
    Sheppard Avenue East and Leslie Street
    This mural is a City of Toronto project managed by Mural Routes. Artist Bill Wrigley drew inspiration for it as he thought about his childhood while driving in traffic. He remembered the freedom and joy he felt leaping, jumping and swinging as a child in the 1960s and wanted this mural to remind other drivers of their childhood.

  8. East Don Parkland
    1240 Sheppard Avenue East
    The East Don Parkland is part of a long chain of parks following the East Don River. The East Don Trail snakes through these ravines and green spaces providing a beautiful opportunity for hiking and biking. In the fall you can often find salmon swimming upstream to spawn. The Don Valley has undergone extensive conservation efforts over the past few decades to create this beautiful urban green space and will continue to improve in the future.

  9. Newtonbrook Creek Path
    55 Forest Grove Drive
    A 5.3 kilometer trail that features a river and is good for all skill levels. The trail meanders its way along a heavily forested valley that features black cherry, beech, skeletal beech, and basswood trees.

  10. Bayview Village Park
    2945 Bayview Avenue
    A 5.2-hectare park on Bayview Avenue north of Sheppard Avenue East that features a ball diamond, three outdoor tennis courts, a splash pad and a children’s playground. Another notable aspect of this park is the air raid siren that remains in the park, which dates back to 1959. Intended to warn against an imminent nuclear attack, it remains an enduring legacy of the Cold War era. The siren is one of only three remaining in Toronto, with the other two being located at Trinity Bellwoods Park and Harbourfront Centre.

Accessibility information: The Jack Pine Remembered, Thomas Clark House, Alice Zhang Art Box, Paul Hollingsworth Art Box, Kids Play Mural, the public art installations within Ethennonnhawahstihnen Park, and the air raid siren in Bayview Village Park are all viewable from the street. Bayview Village Park has paved paths. The trail in the East Don Parklands and Newtonbrook Creek Trail are mostly paved, but may also include steep hills, unpaved and uneven areas.