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University-Rosedale

Ward 11

Baldwin Village
Baldwin Street and Beverley Street
A small but jam-packed pocket of restaurants and shops located along Baldwin Street.

Grange Park
26 Grange Road West
A 1.8 hectare park near Queen Street West and University Avenue featuring a picnic area, a wading pool and a children’s playground. Grange Park is officially owned by the Art Gallery of Ontario, and is run by Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation. The late Harriet Boulton, also known as Mrs. Goldwin Smith, provided in her will that the Grange and annexed lands which was her home would be gifted to the Art Museum of Toronto. The land to the south of the Grange were to be made available for use as a park in perpetuity.

Art Gallery of Ontario
317 Dundas Street West
The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) was originally known as the Toronto Museum of Art when it was founded in 1900. The first home of this museum was in a historic Georgian manor known as The Grange, which was originally built for D’Arcy Boulton Jr., a leading citizen at the time. (The Grange is still part of the AGO to this day, and is one of the oldest surviving buildings in the city). A major expansion to the museum designed by world-renowned architect – and Toronto native – Frank Gehry was opened in 2008, making it one of the most photographed buildings in Toronto. The AGO now contains one of the largest art collections in North America, with close to 95,000 works representing European, Canadian, Indigenous, African, and Oceanic artists. The AGO offers some free programming.

Market 707
707 Dundas Street West
A unique market of retrofitted shipping containers offering a variety of local take-out food and services.

Secret Laneway of Kensington
Glen Baillie Place
*Note: Private property. Please observe the houses from the street only. Travelling down Spadina Avenue between St. Andrew and Dundas streets you’ll find Glen Baille Place. There’s hidden bank of houses built to house construction workers in around 1888.

The Ogimaa Mikana Project
Queen Street West and McCaul Street
The Ogimaa Mikana project was launched in 2013 to reclaim public space through replacing street signs with Anishinaabemowin place names to streets and trails throughout the city. Ogimaa Mikana means “leader’s trail” in tribute to the strong women leaders of the Idle No More movement. This project has renamed Queen St to Ogimaa Mikana and has worked with the City of Toronto to add new signs in other areas of the city such as Davenport Road (Gete-Onigaming) and Spadina Road (Ishpadinaa).

Grange Place Lane Murals
Dundas Street West and Grange Place
Commissioned by the Chinatown BIA, these murals on the buildings in Grange Place are painted by Aaron Li-Hill and Alexa Hatanaka and reflect the area’s Chinese community.

Jean Lumb Lane
East of Huron Street, extending south of Dundas Street West
Jean Lumb was an extraordinary Torontonian and an outstanding Chinese-Canadian woman. Not only did she live nearby (at Dundas Street West and Beverley Street) and co-own a Chinese restaurant, Kwong Chow Chop Suey House, at 126 Elizabeth Street, in Toronto’s first Chinatown, she worked tirelessly as a voice for the Chinese communities in Toronto and across Canada. Jean fought for diversity and integration through food, dance, heritage conservation, and efforts to make immigration legislation more equitable. Her business acumen and outgoing personality were at the foundation of her dedication to civic and community work. In a long line of firsts and the recipient of many honours and awards, Jean became the first Chinese Canadian woman and first restaurateur appointed to the Order of Canada.

Cecil Community Centre & Cecil St Plaque
58 Cecil Street
The Cecil Community Centre has existed as a community hub for many of Toronto’s marginalized communities from the 1920s to 1970s. In 1922, it was converted into a synagogue for the neighbourhood’s growing Jewish population (an onsite plaque exists to commemorate this history). In 1960, it changed into a Chinese Catholic Church for the neighbourhood’s new Chinese population and in the 70s, it was home to the Community Homophile Association of Toronto (CHAT), one of the city’s earliest gay rights groups.

El Mocambo
464 Spadina Avenue
The El Mocambo (est.1948) is an iconic venue for Toronto’s music scene. The Rolling Stones, Fats Domino, Elvis Costello and Ramones have all famously played here among countless other performers. It was recently saved from closure in 2014 and is scheduled to reopen soon following a period of renovations. The El Mocambo is also an important site in Toronto’s LGBTQ2S+ history. The late Will Munro planned some of his first legendary Vazaleen queer rock parties at the club beginning in 1999. Vazaleen was notable for prominently featuring punk and rock music, and was among the few LGBTQ2S+ events to exist outside of the Church-Wellesley Village area at the time.

George Brown House
50 Baldwin Street
*Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. George Brown occupied this house from 1877 until his passing in 1881. Brown was owner and editor of The Globe newspaper, a Senator and a Father of Confederation. Brown and his family also made significant contributions to Canada’s Abolitionist movement and Brown was personally involved in the lives of many Underground Railroad refugees.

First Baptist Church
101 Huron Street
First Baptist Church is the oldest Baptist church and the oldest Black institution in Toronto. In 1826, 12 formerly enslaved people, led by Washington Christian, came together in Toronto (then known as the Town of York) to start a new church. Without a building to worship in, they held services outside or in members’ homes. The church found its first permanent building at Queen and Victoria streets before eventually settling on Huron Street in 1955.

Kensington Market Garden Car
Oxford Street and Augusta Avenue
As you stroll through Kensington Market, you’ll come across the Garden Car, a quirky public art piece out of an old car. Not many know that this is the second car used for this installation. The first was created in 2006 by a now-inactive community group, Streets Are for People. The original car was donated to the PACT Grow-To-Learn Schoolyard Gardening Program. Please note that this car is removed during the winter months.

Wong Association of Ontario Plaque
301 Spadina Avenue
The Wong Association of Ontario is of the oldest Chinese family associations in Canada, dating back to 1912. It was originally located in Toronto’s first Chinatown (near Bay and Dundas Streets) before moving to this location on Spadina Avenue in 1988. The association assisted with employment, housing, immigration services, financial loans and health care and, therefore, was extremely important to early Chinese immigrants.

Kawhi Leonard Mural
522 Queen Street West
This mural by Wales celebrates the 2019 Bill Russell NBA finals’ Most Valuable Player Award winner Kawhi Leonard, who helped lead the Toronto Raptors to their first NBA championship. Seen in the mural is Kawhi Leonard dunking as well as the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy, which is awarded to the NBA champion each year.

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Explore University-Rosedale

Now is the time for residents to experience all that tourists have been raving about for years. Discover shops, stops, places and spaces on city main streets. Stay curious, Toronto.

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DON’T MISS
BigArtTO
October 7 – 10
7:30pm – 10:30pm
Christie Pits Park

Neighbourhood Stroll: Kensington-Chinatown

This stroll passes through lively streets filled with restaurants like Baldwin Village, features some spectacular street art murals, highlights an important icon of the Toronto music scene -The El Mocambo – and notes the area’s important Chinese-Canadian and Jewish cultural history. The stroll goes through both the Chinatown and Kensington Market BIAs, which are filled with a wide array of unique local businesses.

Main Streets: Spadina Avenue, Augusta Avenue, Kensington Avenue, Baldwin Street and Dundas Street West

Note: Some neighbourhood strolls may cross over into more than one ward.

  1. Baldwin Village
    Baldwin Street and Beverley Street
    A small but jam-packed pocket of restaurants and shops located along Baldwin Street.

  2. Grange Park
    26 Grange Road West
    A 1.8 hectare park near Queen Street West and University Avenue featuring a picnic area, a wading pool and a children’s playground. Grange Park is officially owned by the Art Gallery of Ontario, and is run by Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation. The late Harriet Boulton, also known as Mrs. Goldwin Smith, provided in her will that the Grange and annexed lands which was her home would be gifted to the Art Museum of Toronto. The land to the south of the Grange were to be made available for use as a park in perpetuity.

  3. Art Gallery of Ontario
    317 Dundas Street West
    The Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) was originally known as the Toronto Museum of Art when it was founded in 1900. The first home of this museum was in a historic Georgian manor known as The Grange, which was originally built for D’Arcy Boulton Jr., a leading citizen at the time. (The Grange is still part of the AGO to this day, and is one of the oldest surviving buildings in the city). A major expansion to the museum designed by world-renowned architect – and Toronto native – Frank Gehry was opened in 2008, making it one of the most photographed buildings in Toronto. The AGO now contains one of the largest art collections in North America, with close to 95,000 works representing European, Canadian, Indigenous, African, and Oceanic artists. The AGO offers some free programming.

  4. Market 707
    707 Dundas Street West
    A unique market of retrofitted shipping containers offering a variety of local take-out food and services.

  5. Secret Laneway of Kensington
    Glen Baillie Place
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the houses from the street only. Travelling down Spadina Avenue between St. Andrew and Dundas streets you’ll find Glen Baille Place. There’s hidden bank of houses built to house construction workers in around 1888.

  6. The Ogimaa Mikana Project
    Queen Street West and McCaul Street
    The Ogimaa Mikana project was launched in 2013 to reclaim public space through replacing street signs with Anishinaabemowin place names to streets and trails throughout the city. Ogimaa Mikana means “leader’s trail” in tribute to the strong women leaders of the Idle No More movement. This project has renamed Queen St to Ogimaa Mikana and has worked with the City of Toronto to add new signs in other areas of the city such as Davenport Road (Gete-Onigaming) and Spadina Road (Ishpadinaa).

  7. Grange Place Lane Murals
    Dundas Street West and Grange Place
    Commissioned by the Chinatown BIA, these murals on the buildings in Grange Place are painted by Aaron Li-Hill and Alexa Hatanaka and reflect the area’s Chinese community.

  8. Jean Lumb Lane
    East of Huron Street, extending south of Dundas Street West
    Jean Lumb was an extraordinary Torontonian and an outstanding Chinese-Canadian woman. Not only did she live nearby (at Dundas Street West and Beverley Street) and co-own a Chinese restaurant, Kwong Chow Chop Suey House, at 126 Elizabeth Street, in Toronto’s first Chinatown, she worked tirelessly as a voice for the Chinese communities in Toronto and across Canada. Jean fought for diversity and integration through food, dance, heritage conservation, and efforts to make immigration legislation more equitable. Her business acumen and outgoing personality were at the foundation of her dedication to civic and community work. In a long line of firsts and the recipient of many honours and awards, Jean became the first Chinese Canadian woman and first restaurateur appointed to the Order of Canada.

  9. Cecil Community Centre & Cecil St Plaque
    58 Cecil Street
    The Cecil Community Centre has existed as a community hub for many of Toronto’s marginalized communities from the 1920s to 1970s. In 1922, it was converted into a synagogue for the neighbourhood’s growing Jewish population (an onsite plaque exists to commemorate this history). In 1960, it changed into a Chinese Catholic Church for the neighbourhood’s new Chinese population and in the 70s, it was home to the Community Homophile Association of Toronto (CHAT), one of the city’s earliest gay rights groups.

  10. El Mocambo
    464 Spadina Avenue
    The El Mocambo (est.1948) is an iconic venue for Toronto’s music scene. The Rolling Stones, Fats Domino, Elvis Costello and Ramones have all famously played here among countless other performers. It was recently saved from closure in 2014 and is scheduled to reopen soon following a period of renovations. The El Mocambo is also an important site in Toronto’s LGBTQ2S+ history. The late Will Munro planned some of his first legendary Vazaleen queer rock parties at the club beginning in 1999. Vazaleen was notable for prominently featuring punk and rock music, and was among the few LGBTQ2S+ events to exist outside of the Church-Wellesley Village area at the time.

  11. George Brown House
    50 Baldwin Street
    *Note: Private property. Please observe the house from the street only. George Brown occupied this house from 1877 until his passing in 1881. Brown was owner and editor of The Globe newspaper, a Senator and a Father of Confederation. Brown and his family also made significant contributions to Canada’s Abolitionist movement and Brown was personally involved in the lives of many Underground Railroad refugees.

  12. First Baptist Church
    101 Huron Street
    First Baptist Church is the oldest Baptist church and the oldest Black institution in Toronto. In 1826, 12 formerly enslaved people, led by Washington Christian, came together in Toronto (then known as the Town of York) to start a new church. Without a building to worship in, they held services outside or in members’ homes. The church found its first permanent building at Queen and Victoria streets before eventually settling on Huron Street in 1955.

  13. Kensington Market Garden Car
    Oxford Street and Augusta Avenue
    As you stroll through Kensington Market, you’ll come across the Garden Car, a quirky public art piece out of an old car. Not many know that this is the second car used for this installation. The first was created in 2006 by a now-inactive community group, Streets Are for People. The original car was donated to the PACT Grow-To-Learn Schoolyard Gardening Program. Please note that this car is removed during the winter months.

  14. Wong Association of Ontario Plaque
    301 Spadina Avenue
    The Wong Association of Ontario is of the oldest Chinese family associations in Canada, dating back to 1912. It was originally located in Toronto’s first Chinatown (near Bay and Dundas Streets) before moving to this location on Spadina Avenue in 1988. The association assisted with employment, housing, immigration services, financial loans and health care and, therefore, was extremely important to early Chinese immigrants.

  15. Kawhi Leonard Mural
    522 Queen Street West
    This mural by Wales celebrates the 2019 Bill Russell NBA finals’ Most Valuable Player Award winner Kawhi Leonard, who helped lead the Toronto Raptors to their first NBA championship. Seen in the mural is Kawhi Leonard dunking as well as the Larry O’Brien Championship Trophy, which is awarded to the NBA champion each year.

Accessibility information: All points of interest are viewable from the street, and Grange Park has paved walkways throughout.