« Calendar

March 1, 2014

Category: Museums & Visual Arts

The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918

The Great Upheaval: Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection, 1910-1918 showcases the dynamism, creativity, and innovation of art produced in Europe in the years leading up to and during the First World War. Featuring paintings from the collection of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum by artists such as Constantin Brancusi, Marc Chagall, Marcel Duchamp, Vasily Kandinsky, Fernand Leger, Henri Matisse, Amedeo Modigliani, Piet Mondrian and Pablo Picasso, among others, the exhibition chronologically traces the achievements of these tumultuous years as artists experimented with new ways to create art while launching such movements as expressionism, futurism and cubism.

The exhibition’s focus on the years 1910 to 1918 represents an intense chapter in European and world history, marked by sweeping social change, technological developments and scientific advances. During this time of tremendous creativity and innovation, European cities were evolving, and artists, who were founding groups, staging exhibitions and issuing manifestoes, likewise adapted and responded to 20th-century modernity.

The Great Upheaval spotlights the dynamism of this fertile period — as artists hurtled toward abstraction and the ultimate “great upheaval” of a catastrophic war — while presenting some of the foundational modern masterpieces that shaped the art of future generations.

Organized by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York.

For more details: www.ago.net/the-great-upheaval-modern-masterpieces-from-the-guggenheim-collection/

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario — 317 Dundas Street West

Paul Kane – French River Rapids

The Royal Ontario Museum (ROM) presents its newest rotation, an exhibit highlighting the art of Paul Kane, one of Canada’s most influential artists. The exhibit is displayed in the Daphne Cockwell Gallery of Canada: First Peoples from August 24, 2013 to March 16, 2014. The rotation is inspired by the symbiotic relationship between art history and archaeology.

The display brings together 32 artifacts on loan from Quetico Provincial Park and Archaeological Services Inc. along with Kane’s painting “French River Rapids”. Additionally, the oil-on-canvas painting “Fishing by Torch Light” is shown in concert with Kane’s oil-on-paper field sketch of the same name. Comprising two sections, this exhibit focuses on two of Kane’s paintings.

For more information: www.rom.on.ca

Location: Royal Ontario Museum — 100 Queen’s Park

 
Start: August 24, 2013
End: March 16, 2014
Category:, ,
Location: Royal Ontario Museum

Out of the Box: The Rise of Sneaker Culture

On April 25, 2013 the BSM opened Out of the Box: The Rise of Sneaker Culture, an exhibition that explores the history of the sneaker from the 19th century through to today. Out of the Box is the first exhibition in North America to showcase the history of sneaker culture and will feature over 120 sneakers representing the past 150 years. Highlighting iconic sneakers from the 20th and 21st centuries, Museum visitors will have the opportunity to explore the historical beginnings of the sneaker from its emergence in the 19th century to becoming one of the most democratic forms of footwear in the 20th century to its current position as status symbol and icon of urban culture.

Rare sneakers from the archives of adidas, Nike, Reebok, PUMA, Converse and Northampton Museums and Art Gallery, along with loans from rap legends Run DMC, sneaker guru Bobbito Garcia aka Kool Bob Love and Dee Wells from OSD are featured. The exhibition also includes the latest designs from fashion designers, including Christian Louboutin, Pierre Hardy, Lanvin and Prada, as well as exceptional limited editions such as the Nike Dunk Supremes and LeBron James Stewies. A particular highlight is the handpicked sneakers and sketches by Nike designers Tinker Hatfield, Tobie Hatfield, Mark Smith and Eric Avar.

For more details: www.batashoemuseum.ca

Location: Bata Shoe Museum — 327 Bloor Street West

bata-shoe-museum-logo
Start: April 25, 2013
End: March 30, 2014
Category:,
Location: Bata Shoe Museum, The

New Exhibition at the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre

The Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre has opened a new art gallery, part of the RBC Emerging Artists Project.

The first exhibition entitled Moving on: Ryerson University Students Explore Urban Transport around the Greater Toronto Area
features the work of second-year photography production students from Ryerson University’s Image Arts program.
At a time when thinking about transit has never been more important in this city, the students embarked on a
documentary project on the subject of urban transportation. This exhibition offers the viewer a varied and
nuanced look at the day-to-day experience of Toronto’s current transit system and the construction of its future one.

The exhibition is co-sponsored by Metrolinx and runs until April 3, 2014.

Dates: January 31 to April 3, 2014.
Admission: FREE.
Gallery Hours: Thursday, Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Location: The Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre, Gallery Level
189 Yonge Street.

For more information www.heritagetrust.on.ca/ewg

About RBC Emerging Artists Project:
The RBC Emerging Artists Project is a unique partnership with the Ontario Heritage Trust
that has allowed the Elgin and Winter Garden Theatre Centre to develop a gallery for
exhibiting student and emerging artists’ work.

Elgin Auditorium -Peter Lusztyk
Start: January 31, 2014
End: April 3, 2014
Category:,
Venue: Unnamed Venue
Address:
Toronto, Ontario

An “Exquisite Corpse”: Poetry and Chance in Surrealist Drawings

October 26, 2013 – April 13, 2014.

Esther and Arthur Gelber Treasury.

The focus of this installation is a rare cadavre exquis (exquisite corpse) drawing, a remarkable new AGO acquisition made collaboratively by several major Surrealist artists. The creation of cadavre exquis drawings began in the 1920s as a parlour game. One artist made marks on a piece of paper, covered that section, and then passed the paper to the next person. As the paper travelled around the room, multiple artists made additions. The Surrealists were astounded by the powerful results of this activity, which reinforced their belief in “automatism,” the idea that works of art could be produced as expressions of the subconscious, the irrational and dreams. Many artists incorporated automatist approaches into their artistic practices.

For more details: www.ago.net

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario — 317 Dundas Street West

 
Start: October 26, 2013
End: April 13, 2014
Category:,

Mary Pratt

Mary Pratt has become one of Canada’s most distinguished artists, celebrated for her work with familiar subject matter and domestic still lifes. The deceptively simple bliss of these scenes reveals a sophisticated approach to everyday life. Her works are skillfully executed and present nuances of tone, brushstroke, angle and choice of subject that leave viewers of Pratt’s images with a sense of wonder and occasional unease. These substantial artworks have multi-layered meanings for the artist, and for the viewers who encounter the range, subtlety and power of this remarkable painter. At once highly contemporary and deeply rooted in the traditions of art history, Pratt’s work reveals the breadth of emotion, skill and maturity that she brings to her practice.

The exhibition Mary Pratt is not a retrospective in the customary sense of the word. Concentrating on Pratt’s oils and mixed media paintings, the exhibition juxtaposes more than sixty works from different times in Pratt’s career. It mirrors the manner in which she approaches her subject—as an interwoven conversation of themes. Despite describing herself as “consistently inconsistent,” Pratt has enduring preoccupations. Her time is not dictated by clocks but rather numbered by daily rituals and the act of making ready. Pratt dwells on her surroundings, allowing a sideways autobiography through the objects and individuals that encompass her.

Touring nationally, the exhibition allows visitors across the country to view widely recognized as well as rarely seen works from the past five decades, gathered from private and public collections. It showcases Pratt’s “tougher” paintings (to use her own description of them) alongside allusive works, all embodying the intensity and compassion with which she views her world.

For more details: www.mcmichael.com/marypratt/

Location: McMichael Canadian Art Collection — 10365 Islington Avenue, Kleinburg, Ontario

 
Start: January 18, 2014
End: April 27, 2014
Category:,
Location: McMichael Canadian Art Collection

Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography

In 1977, the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) purchased its first photograph: Arnold Newman’s collage portrait of Henry Moore, a fitting complement to the 1974 gift of Moore’s plasters to the gallery. This purchase marked the initial focus for collecting photography at the gallery: portraits of artists. The photography holdings have since grown to number more than 50,000 works. Though the collection now spans the wide reach and long history of the medium, portraits remain one of its strongest threads.

In Part II of Light My Fire: Some Propositions about Portraits and Photography – a show that Toronto Star art critic Murray Whyte called “utterly beguiling” – discover a fresh selection of more than 120 portraits from the AGO’s permanent collection, along with select loans from local private collections. Organized under two new propositions, these works showcase the descriptive power of the medium but also its malleability.

“We are Not Ourselves” highlights the ways artists have manipulated photographic materials to create or reveal strange states of being. Through collage, long exposure, darkroom doubling and retouching, among other techniques, each of these photographs lead us from the realm of the familiar and recognizable to other more mysterious planes of existence.

For more details: www.ago.net

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario — 317 Dundas Street West

 
Start: October 26, 2013
End: May 1, 2014
Category:,
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

What’s So Funny? Recent Acquisitions of Humorous Art

December 21, 2013 – May 2014.

In 1976 the Trier-Fodor Foundation gave the Art Gallery of Ontario more than 1100 works by the humorist and illustrator Walter Trier. The gift was accompanied by an endowment to support the acquisition and exhibition of humorous, satirical and illustrative graphic art. More than 500 prints and drawings, representing highlights in the history of caricature, have been purchased with this fund. This installation features works that have been acquired in the past five years, which date from the late 1700s to the early 1800s.

Organized by the Art Gallery of Ontario.

For more details: www.ago.net

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario — 317 Dundas Street West

 
Start: December 21, 2013
End: May 1, 2014
Category:,
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario

This Is Not A Toy: The Urban Vinyl Phenomenon

February 6 – May 18, 2014.

Location: DX Exhibit Hall, Design Exchange — 234 Bay Street

Curators: DX Associate Curator, Sara Nickleson; Guest Curators John Wee
Tom and music icon Pharrell Williams.

This Is Not A Toy takes its name from the disclaimer found on packaging for objects geared to adults
or which might be harmful to young children – they may be called toys, but they are not intended for
play. The title also references Rene Magritte’s Ceci N’est Pas Un Pipe, one of the seminal works of
art of the 20th century, which plays with the Duchampian notion of object, semantics and context in
determining a work’s meaning and significance. Each of these theoretical groundings establish the
exhibition’s framework: presenting the works as art and design objects and providing a platform for
conceptual discourse.

Lying at the intersection of fine art, marketing, pop culture, product and graphic design, designer
toys are highly collectible objects for a post-Pop world. Artists use the infrastructure of mass production
to create variation, personal expression and limited edition objects that range in price from just a
few dollars to many thousands more. With roots in late 1980s graffiti culture, urban vinyl is a subversive
art form that is as much rebellious as it is playful. These art toys reject and appropriate familiar
consumer imagery, manipulating household names and visual icons from Disney to Chanel thereby
shifting control from brand to artist, and ultimately, consumer. Some manipulate familiar visual tropes
while others create their own original forms, characters and worlds.

For more details: www.dx.org

 
Start: February 6, 2014
End: May 18, 2014
Category:,
Location: Design Exchange

Kenojuak Ashevak: In Memoriam

September 28, 2013 – June 2014.

Isadore and Rosalie Sharp gallery.

With the passing of senior Inuit artist Kenojuak Ashevak in 2013, the Canadian cultural landscape has been significantly diminished. Over a long and influential career, Kenojuak produced innovative work that inspired her peers as well as younger generations of artists. Her visionary imagery drew on personal experience and reflected deep connections to family, community and her surroundings. Kenojuak’s lyrical animal forms remain, for many, absolutely central to the Canadian story.

Organized by Art Gallery of Ontario.

For more details: www.ago.net

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario — 317 Dundas Street West

 
Start: September 28, 2013
End: June 1, 2014
Category:, ,
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario