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April 11, 2013

Category: Museums & Visual Arts

Alfredo Jaar: The Politics of Images

Alfredo Jaar: The Politics of Images curated by Gaëlle Morel, exhibitions curator at the RIC, addresses political concerns and the relationship between ethics and aesthetics. The Chilean-born, New York-based, Jaar highlights ignored contemporary tragedies such as genocides, epidemics, and famines, to promote cultural change.In his works “Searching for Africa in LIFE” (1996) and “From Time to Time” (2006), Jaar displays covers of news magazines to analyze the lack of visibility and the visual clichés about Africa disseminated in Western culture.

The artist’s three-channel video “We Wish to Inform You That We Didn’t Know” (2010), his most recent project on the genocide in Rwanda, acts as an epilogue to “The Rwanda Project, 1994-2000″, a series of twenty-five artworks developed to critique the world’s indifference and inaction to that mass murder. Alfredo Jaar: The Politics of Images will be on view in the Ryerson Image Centre University Gallery January 23 – April 14, 2013.

For more information, visit the Ryerson Image Centre website.

Ryerson Image Centre
Start: January 23, 2013
End: April 14, 2013
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HUMAN RIGHTS, HUMAN WRONGS

Featuring 316 original prints from the prestigious Black Star Collection, HUMAN RIGHTS HUMAN WRONGS uses the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a point of departure to examine whether images of political struggle, suffering and victims of violence work for or against humanitarian objectives, especially when considering questions of race, representation, ethical responsibility and the cultural position of the photographer.

Curated by Mark Sealy, Director of Autograph ABP in London, England, HUMAN RIGHTS HUMAN WRONGS begins circa 1945 and includes well-known Civil Rights Movement events such as the Selma to Montgomery March and Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech. The exhibition also features images of the independence movements in African countries including Kenya, Algeria, Chad, and Congo; portraits of Nobel Peace Prize winners Lester B. Pearson, Yasser Arafat, and René Cassin; images of protests in locations such as Berkeley, Chile, and Argentina; and war and conflict from the Vietnam War to the Rwandan Genocide in 1994.

Through HUMAN RIGHTS HUMAN WRONGS, we see the wide dissemination of photographic images of humankind in abject, euphoric or violently explicit conditions, and examine how these images assist us in understanding the case for human and civil rights. Made possible by the generous support of TD Bank Group, with additional funding from the Paul J. Ruhnke Memorial Fund, the Howard and Carole Tanenbaum Family Charitable Foundation and Ryerson University, the exhibition is a collaboration with Autograph ABP (supported by Arts Council England). HUMAN RIGHTS HUMAN WRONGS will be on view in the Ryerson Image Centre Main Gallery January 23 – April 14, 2013.

For more information, visit the Ryerson Image Centre website.

Ryerson Image Centre
Start: January 23, 2013
End: April 14, 2013
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Clive Holden: UNAMERICAN UNFAMOUS

Clive Holden asks, “Is it un-American to be un-famous? Are Americans failures if they die without fame?” Drawing from the Black Star Collection at Ryerson University, he creates UNAMERICAN UNFAMOUS using the “un-famous” as an organizing principle in his selection of one hundred image details and faces. Plucked from obscurity, these people can be found in the backgrounds of famous photographs, or simply hidden in the depths of a photographic archive. At times they are literally seen over the shoulders of celebrities in the iconic photographs that capture the “American Century”.

The work’s media tile construction is made with a hybrid adaptation of photographic, cinematic, and web tools. It also uses film leader as raw material (the beginning and end pieces of film reels). With a complex series of randomizing algorithms, these film loops are juxtaposed and continually remixed with the “unsung human leaders” found in the Black Star Collection, as well as with photographs of local un-famous un-Americans nominated by members of the general public.

The work will evolve over the course of the exhibition as more images are submitted via social media. Clive Holden: UNAMERICAN UNFAMOUS is curated by Gaëlle Morel, and will be on view on the Ryerson Image Centre’s Salah J. Bachir New Media Wall January 23 – April 14, 2013.

For more information, visit the Ryerson Image Centre website.

Ryerson Image Centre
Start: January 23, 2013
End: April 14, 2013
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Uncanny

The artists in this exhibition have an investigative outlook and continue to be informed by historical process of the
image in a contemporary and thought-provoking way. Sound, Video, Photography and the view’s own memory provide an image-based
platform for exploring the metamorphosis of the uncanny, a term that Sigmund Freud used to describe a psychological feeling
between terror and fascination. The uncanny is supernatural and fascinating leaving us feeling disturbed in a state of wonderment
and fear.

For more details: www.artgalleryofmississauga.com

Location: Art Gallery of Mississauga — 300 City Centre Drive

 
Start: March 7, 2013
End: April 20, 2013
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Location: Art Gallery of Mississauga

Sweetness of the Work

Sweetness of the Work is part of a collection exploring the possibilities fo crystalline forms in the lace work. In this installation,
Mississauga-based Noelle Hamlyn works with cotton thread embroidered to create web like structures which are then exposed to a saline solution.
This process encourages the formation of crystals. The evapouration rate, sun exposure, temperature, salt type and saturation of the solution
were varied to create this delicate lace form, floating in space. The process, as well as the nature of the resulting salt crytals on the
embroidered surface creates an apt metaphor for the accumulation of stitches, labour and the hours invested in traditional women’s hand work.
Sweetness of the Work is an homage to the salt tears of the seamstress, as if a gentle meditation on the loss of traditional hand skills. It
also speaks to the hierarchical structures that shape our perception of “women’s work” exposing cloth and lace work as a sociopolitical medium
of contemporary relevance.

For more details: www.artgalleryofmississauga.com

Location: Art Gallery of Mississauga — 300 City Centre Drive

 
Start: March 7, 2013
End: April 20, 2013
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Location: Art Gallery of Mississauga

tiff.kids International Film Festival

TIFF Kids offers a diverse slate of films from Canada and around the world — films that take children and parents out of the everyday, and use the power of film to foster thought and encourage discussion about the complex and challenging issues facing young people today, and have lots of fun doing it.

Location: TIFF Bell Lightbox, 350 King Street West

For more information, visit the TIFF Kids website.

tiffkids2013
Start: April 9, 2013
End: April 21, 2013
Category:, ,
Location: TIFF Bell Lightbox

The Toronto Jewish Film Festival

The Toronto Jewish Film Festival celebrates its 20th Anniversary with over 95 films representing 15 countries.

Sweden, Austria and the United Kingdom don’t produce many films dealing with Jewish history and identity. However, this year we present films from those places, which offer unusual or little-known stories and unconventional takes on familiar themes and genres.

From the UK, How to Re-Establish a Vodka Empire offers a unique look at Jewish history in both the Ukraine and Northern Ireland. Simon and the Oaks, a Swedish family drama, offers a sumptuously-photographed and intricate psychological portrait of a young man, who must confront his newly-discovered Jewish identity in the years immediately following the Second World War. My BestEnemy is a thriller set during the Nazis’ annexing of Austria, which is audaciously filled with entertaining plot twists and elements of farce.

There are also wonderful comedies that should not be missed. From Argentina, My First Wedding is a comedy of errors filled with a cast of eccentric family members, and of course, a priest and a rabbi. Let My People Go is a charmingly offbeat French comedy that mocks Jewish and gay stereotypes. OSS 117: Lost in Rio is a laugh-outloud parody of 1960s spy films, from Michel Hazanavicius and Jean Dujardin, the Oscar®-winning director and star of The Artist. And many more…

For more details: www.tjff.com

Location: Various Venues

Start: April 11, 2013
End: April 21, 2013
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Althea Thauberger: Marat Sade Bohnice

The Power Plant is pleased to present Althea Thauberger’s Marat Sade
Bohnice
to North American audiences for the first time. Her project for The
Power Plant is an experimental documentary/video installation about the
staging of Peter Weiss’s 1963 play Marat/Sade at the Bohnice Psychiatric
Hospital in Prague. This new work approaches issues of timely reassessment,
institutionalization and shifting political terrain.

For more information, visit powerplant.org

 
Start: December 15, 2012
End: May 5, 2013
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Location: The Power Plant

Beat Nation: Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture

Beat Nation: Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture describes a generation of
artists who juxtapose urban youth culture with Aboriginal identity to create
innovative and unexpected new works—in painting, sculpture, installation,
performance and video—that reflect the current realities of Aboriginal peoples
today.

Organized by the Vancouver Art Gallery and based on an initiative of
grunt gallery, the exhibition includes work by: Jackson 2bears, KC Adams,
Sonny Assu, Bear Witness, Jordan Bennett, Raymond Boisjoly,
Corey Bulpitt & Gurl 23, Kevin Lee Burton, Raven Chacon,
Nicholas Galanin, Maria Hupfield, Mark Igloliorte, Cheryl L’Hirondelle,
Duane Linklater, madeskimo, Dylan Miner, Kent Monkman,
Marianne Nicolson, Skeena Reece, Hoka Skenandore, and
Rolande Souliere.

For more information, visit thepowerplant.org

 
Start: December 15, 2012
End: May 5, 2013
Category:, ,
Location: The Power Plant

Patti Smith: Camera Solo

This exhibition is included with General Admission pricing. This winter the AGO offers a glimpse into the world of legendary musician and artist Patti Smith through an intimate exhibition featuring photographs, personal objects, and a short film. Patti Smith: Camera Solo provides a rare opportunity to experience a different side of this rock icon – best known for her profound influence on the nascent punk rock scene in the late 1970s and 80s – through her poetic expression in the visual arts.

The first presentation of Smith’s works in Canada, this exhibition highlights the continual connections between Smith’s photography and her interest in poetry and literature. For more than four decades, she has documented sights and spaces infused with personal significance. Her visual work possesses the same unfiltered, emotional quality prevalent in her poetry and music lyrics: their allure lies in their often dreamlike imagery; their modest scale belies their depth and power.

For more details: www.ago.net/patti-smith-camera-solo

Location: Art Gallery of Ontario — 317 Dundas Street West

Art Gallery of Ontario
Start: February 9, 2013
End: May 19, 2013
Category:,
Location: Art Gallery of Ontario